The Year of No Fear – HIV today

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What does it mean to be HIV positive today?  

I was diagnosed on 12 August this year and I was lucky. I was diagnosed in what I call ‘the year of no fear’.

Thanks to the PARTNER study and the PROUD study our HIV status, be it positive or negative has less potential to polarize and divide us. The PARTNER study showed that condoms were no longer needed to prevent HIV transmission so long as the HIV positive person had an undetectable viral load on HIV treatment (ART). The PROUD study showed that HIV negative men taking daily PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) were protected against HIV transmission, again even without condoms. For the first time in 30 years we truly have the opportunity to live and thrive as HIV equals.

So I was diagnosed as HIV positive and publicly disclosed my status immediately because I felt empowered by this knowledge and fearless because of these studies. Sure, there would be social hurdles but that’s the amazing part – I’m not a Scientist or a Doctor. They have done their bit by affording me these comforts. Now it’s my turn to do my bit. I’m just an everyday person with no clinical background but what I can do is change people and their preconceptions. I can – we all can.

But the opportunities expand well beyond just deconstructing stigma and establishing equality. We now also have the chance to start winning the fight against HIV and AIDS. It’s time to look to San Francisco for the beacon of hope and pioneering example.

San Francisco is the only city that have stabilised their number of new HIV infections. In the last 3 years they have delivered a 30% reduction. The reasons why are simple. TasP (Treatment as Prevention) where anyone diagnosed with HIV is on effective ART (Antiretroviral Therapy) and are therefore undetectable and non-infectious, combined with PrEP for HIV negative people. 

Always seemingly a step ahead, San Francisco embarked on their RAPID initiative, involving 39 men from July 2014 to December 2014, which implemented a process of treatment at point of diagnosis. This in effect speeded up the process of beginning ART (Antiretroviral Therapy), preventing people from falling out of the system by collapsing some of the steps of the care continuum. Thus reducing the window of onward transmission from infectious newly diagnosed patients.

In the UK the clinical benefits of earlier treatment were shown in an international study called START. It is undoubtedly one of the most important HIV studies of the last decade. It was designed to look at the benefits and risks of early HIV treatment (ART). The results were both exciting and reassuring for people living with HIV today. The following is from HIV i-Base.

Main findings include:

  • HIV treatment was safe for people starting HIV meds with a high CD4 count. Many people in START had a CD4 count above 800.
  • Early treatment led to fewer serious AIDS-related illnesses, even at high CD4 counts.
  • The biggest [negative/general health] impact from early treatment was expected to be on illnesses like heart, liver and kidney disease and some non-AIDS cancers. The opposite was true in that early ART reduced HIV-related illnesses. This is big news.
  • The results were similar in both low- and high-income countries. This should result in making HIV treatment more available in all countries.

Secondly, the results show that benefits of treatment and prevention overlap. Other studies have proven that treatment dramatically reduces HIV transmission. Now people using treatment as prevention (TasP) will know there are direct benefits for their own personal health as well as that of the community.

Ultimately, it’s not about us and our generation. I have two 5 year old nephews and I would love to think that by the time they are in their 20’s that we will have managed to reduce our number of new HIV infections in the UK to such a low level that neither of them need ever worry about contracting HIV as I have. It is for them and our children that we need to take responsibility and action now!

We need to manage and reduce this country’s alarming and unacceptably high number of new HIV infections. Let us put the focus back on the AIDS crisis. There is still an AIDS crisis. Not in this country, here in the UK we have a ‘new HIV infections’ issue – not an AIDS crisis. But in sub-Saharan Africa and even as close by as Eastern Europe and Russia they still have an AIDS crisis.

Our brothers and sisters before us did not die of AIDS so that we could become complacent with HIV and allow ourselves to be immersed in AIDS apathy. It started with them, it can end with us. We have the tools to stop and end HIV and AIDS. We need to use them. 

We can’t allow our privileges to diminish our responsibilities in this global healthcare issue.

Continue reading “The Year of No Fear – HIV today”

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FUCK other STIs

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It has become clear to me over the last few months that we have a very real problem as gay men. We really don’t talk about our sex lives HONESTLY. Particularly with regards to sex and condoms. This is one of the main reasons why we have seen new HIV infections rise and rise – year after year. 6000 new HIV infections were diagnosed in the UK last year alone (and countless others that are yet undiagnosed). I’m going to go way out there and just state it as I see it. Put moral judgements aside and stop debating what we (gay men) should and shouldn’t be doing. The simple fact is that people do not always use a condom for penetrative sex all the time, every time. Yesterday I had a conversation with a friend of mine who had told me previously and several times that he “doesn’t really ever bareback” but he did at the weekend. He’s now on PEP for the next month. In my own case, even though I had spells of busy sexual activity, I didn’t bareback that much or over a long period of time. And when I did have condomless sex I always tried to box clever. I of all people am very real proof that no matter how HIV aware and educated you are – you can’t outsmart HIV on your own.

If I had have been able to get PrEP I would still be HIV negative.

PrEP is only about HIV protection – it doesn’t claim to offer protection against any other STI. So it’s infuriating for me to constantly hear this “what about other STIs?” sensationalism and attempted counter claim to the benefits of PrEP. It’s like saying wearing a seat belt won’t stop you getting cancer! Of course it won’t! It’s not designed to protect you from getting cancer – it is designed to help protect you in a car should you have a driving accident. PrEP and HIV protection is exactly the same. PrEP is amazingly effective at protecting you from HIV! That is what it is designed for – nothing else. Every other STI can be immunised against or cured – even Hep C (Harvoni is the new treatment). Yes, drug resistant gonorrhea is obviously a concern but you can catch that from oral sex. And realistically…how many people wear a condom for oral sex? Very few. You can catch every other STI from oral sex.

So please stop and think about this before screaming about ‘other STIs’ when discussing PrEP.

In my experience people who want PrEP don’t want it to START barebacking – they want it because they ALREADY ARE barebacking.

They are aware that they are taking risks and they just want to protect themselves. Personally I think that is amazing and that these guys should be commended.

I have so much interaction with the users of our website. It’s incredibly inspiring and exciting. This has been an amazing year for HIV awareness, anti-stigma and HIV prevention developments. Next year is going to be a hugely transformative year in the HIV arena. The future is PrEP – the future is here!

Continue reading “FUCK other STIs”

PrEP is NOT about SEX

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PrEP is NOT about sex. PrEP is about HIV prevention and the deconstruction of HIV stigma.

Too often online I am met with PrEP shaming. In fact all variants of shaming. You name it and you can be guaranteed that someone will directly or indirectly set about trying to shame you for it. This is our first battle. The battle within ourselves and within our community. Just STOP IT! It’s not helpful or constructive. Fuck it! I will go as far as saying it’s darn right destructive and obstructive!

Why do we do this? And why is bareback sex BAD sex? I’ll tell you why! Because no matter how much we think we may now be accepted and integrated into a mainstream society we are still conditioned to believe that we should not be free to enjoy the kind of sex that we like. It’s a case of…

“Yes, you can fuck that guy up the ass but you better do it with a condom – otherwise you will catch HIV as punishment for being a bad gay”

Or…

“You can fuck that guy up the ass but how dare you ENJOY that sex without a condom because you are using PrEP”

This is in essence what other people are conditioning us to accept. And you can see how ludicrous those statements are.

Originally condoms were used for pregnancy prevention. Condoms were for straight people. Then when AIDS arrived, condoms were for gays and AIDS protection. The kind of sex gay men were engaging in ‘pre-AIDS’ was condomless sex. This was natural, good sex. Now condomless sex is seen as bad bum sex! Barebacking – it even sounds dirty, dangerous and feral.

I honestly couldn’t give a fuck who chooses to wear a condom and who doesn’t. That is each person’s own choice and to be negotiated with whomever he chooses to interact with sexually on a situation specific basis. No one has the right to impose their moral judgements on anyone else. Especially not when it comes to something so personal and intimate as the kind of sex we should or should not be having. As long as we are all responsible and considerate. PrEP is both responsible and considerate.

I find with people in general (not just gay men) that they don’t respond very well to being told “DON’T do this” or “DON’T do that”. Instead what they respond to positively and embracingly is been offered something they ‘can DO’ ie be given the choice of opting in for PrEP.

Here is an unused section of the interview I gave to HIV Equal. I thought it was worth sharing .

PrEP and slut-shaming
PrEP has been stigmatised here but attitudes are changing quickly, people are really switching on to the idea now… here is a post that I put on facebook…

“It seems our PrEP website users are as capable of taking matters into their own hands as much as we are… We haven’t managed to secure ANY funding yet and so currently have no promotional and marketing budget to allocate to producing some branded items… But Mark (our first IWPN user to post his PrEP delivery) has decided that he’s got this covered! He took the artwork and logo and created (and paid for) his own www.iwantprepnow.co.uk  t-shirt that he is proudly going to wear on holiday!!! You see this is what PrEP is all about!!!! Forget about ‘little blue pills’ forget about ‘sex’!! It’s not about that – it’s this simple…PrEP can help our mates stay HIV negative and help kill stigma towards HIV positive people like me. It’s a community thing that benefits ALL of us. PrEP ‘shouldn’t’ be my fight!!! It’s too late for me to take it…so that is EXACTLY why it IS my fight and YOURS TOO. We all want to help our mates stay happy and stay healthy… We ALL support PrEP – it might just take some of us a little while to realise it – but that’s cool too Xx”

How www.iwantprepnow.co.uk came about
I started a big push on raising awareness of PrEP at the beginning of this year. No one else was really doing that here in the UK. As the momentum and interest grew so did the volume of messages I was getting in my facebook and Twitter inboxes. More and more guys were contacting me directly asking for info and where/how to get PrEP. I was struggling to keep up with the enquiries and so I spoke with my buddy Alex Craddock the co-founder of IWPN who was and is currently using PrEP (daily) as HIV protection and we agreed that it was a bit ridiculous that there wasn’t 1 place/site with all of the basic info you need about PrEP, supporting documents and links to trusted sites to purchase tested and verified generic PrEP. And that was its point of conception. Neither of us had the capacity to continue acting as an online PrEP help desk or call centre for PrEP info and access. We did some research and had some guidance from the right people and within 4 weeks we were live.

PrEP and the NHS
It is frustrating of course because over the last 30 years in the battle against HIV and AIDS, despite everyone’s best intentions and efforts – what we have been doing has not worked. That is not to diminish the huge amount of work, passion, heart and soul that my peers and predecessors contributed. Until recently the use of condoms, abstinence or remaining in a totally 100% monogamous relationship with another HIV negative person were the only options. Recently though with the release of the findings from The Partner Study we have discovered and begun to acknowledge and accept that condom-less sex with a HIV positive and undetectable guy is also HIV safer sex, it is practically impossible for an undetectable guy to pass on the virus.
Now we have the option of PrEP as another tool for HIV protection. The protection PrEP offers is close to 100%. A guy in the Damon L Jacob’s Facebook group ‘PrEP FACTS’ worked out the figures…here they are from his calculations…

“Almost nothing in medicine is 100%, probably including PrEP. But the research suggests that daily Truvada reduces the risk of acquiring HIV by 96% or even 99%. At 99%, that takes your 1.4% per incident risk down to 0.014%. If an HIV-postive partner is on effective HAART and virally suppressed, there is additional 96% risk reduction (at least), bringing the 0.014% down to 0.0006%. This is very close to zero.”

To put it very simply and at the risk of setting myself up for attack from ‘condom advocates’…

Condoms – even readily available FREE condoms aren’t working to reduce new infections.

If you don’t use a condom every single time you have any sex even oral sex then you are not 100% protected and even if you do manage to use a condom every single time you have sex – it can still break.

And this is the beauty and game changing potential of PrEP. If you take PrEP daily – you are HIV PROTECTED!

Here in the UK it costs the NHS about £20,000 per year to treat a HIV positive person. But to provide Truvada as PrEP for a HIV negative person would only cost the NHS about £5000 per year. If you want to take that a step further, generic PrEP can be purchased through our website for about £45 per month. So a year’s supply would only cost £540. That is one hell of a price comparison.

Of course these are just figures and price tags. The human/emotional value of helping someone remain HIV negative is priceless and on that front we can no longer shrug our responsibilities.

For the first time in 30 years we now have the chance to start winning. Winning against stigma too. If a negative guy is on PrEP he doesn’t need to concern himself with anyone else’s HIV status because he is protecting his own HIV negative status (and his sexual partners HIV negative statuses) by using PrEP – he is in total control.

San Francisco is the only city that have stabilised and are now reducing their number of new HIV infections. The reasons why are simple. TASP (Treatment as Prevention) where HIV positive guys are on effective ART (Antiretroviral Therapy) and are therefore HIV undetectable and non-infectious combined with PrEP for HIV negative guys. Can you see how perfect this combination is?

Positive guys can’t pass on HIV and negative guys can’t catch it. This is how we are going to win.

It’s not about us and our generation. I have two 5 year old nephews and I would love to think that by the time they are in their 20’s that we will have managed to reduce our number of new HIV infections in the UK to such a low level that neither of them need ever worry about contracting HIV as I have. It is for them and our straight friend’s kids that we need to own this and take responsibility and action NOW!

My long term goals for PrEP and TASP are to manage and reduce this country’s alarming and unacceptable number of new HIV infections then once we have our house in order lets put the focus back on the AIDS crisis. There is still an AIDS crisis. Not in this country, here in the UK we have a ‘new HIV infections’ issue – not an AIDS crisis. But in sub-Saharan Africa and even as close by as Eastern Europe and Russia they still have an AIDS crisis. We can’t allow our privileges to diminish our responsibilities in this global health care issue.

Continue reading “PrEP is NOT about SEX”

AIDS SHITS AND GIGGLES

Let’s Talk About Gay Sex and Drugs – ALIENS

Act Up London are an AIDS activist group billed on their facebook page as a diverse, non-partisan group of individuals united in anger and committed to direct action to end the HIV pandemic. Until recently AIDS activism was an ‘alien’ concept to me. However far from being the ‘angry’ bunch of individuals that I was expecting to encounter at this group, they were warm, open, welcoming and fun if not regularly fucking hilarious!

Last Tuesday afternoon on a mere 2 hours sleep after working all night at Popcorn at Heaven, I wearily made my way to Angel for the Act Up summer fair at the Positively UK offices. To say that I was less than my bouncy, usual self is an understatement. I was pro-actively 30 mins early for the 3pm kick off. As I posted my obligatory check in and promotional post on facebook, Dan Glass replied to the thread to let me know he was going to be fashionably late by about 20 mins so it was looking like the day was going to be a longer, more draining ball buster than it was already feeling like.

My brother had arranged to join the event after work to catch up with me and get a glimpse into what his ‘Social Outlier’ big bro actually got up to at these intriguingly ‘alien’ aids shin digs!

Towards the end of the meeting, after my brother a few other latecomers arrived and joined us, Dan Glass decided to throw another one of his impromptu icebreaker activities of name and statement rounds. The theme of this round was “state your name and something that no one else here knows about you”…

This is where hilarity broke out! I honestly almost pissed myself laughing…leading me seamlessly on to shit…Yes, shit. Tom our wonderfully fabulous cis-male joker proceeded to tell a story of when he found himself in KFC in Hackney – bursting for a poo that he had been in labour with all day. He deposited said poo in the KFC toilets, which he then tried to flush away. However the gods of the porcelain bowl were against him and the poo refused to go! So he flushed again further filling the blocked loo causing the monster poo to float up and over the toilet rim and land firmly at this feet – which he now takes the time to point out were dressed in 6 inch stilettos, below his ra-ra skirt! In a panic he decided to take action and leave the KFC, however as he opened the door the poo decided that it wasn’t ready to say goodbye to Tom just yet and surfed out of the loo and onto the main floor of the restaurant alongside six and a half foot Tom in heels and a ra-ra skirt!

Tom’s shit story seemed to have totally broken the ice beyond all expectation and we quickly arrived at sexual tales of the most graphic and amusing nature.

We soon arrived at my brother’s moment to share his name and chosen story, I was starting to feel nervous and uncomfortable! And I think he knew…He begins….

“Hi everybody, I’m Brendan and I’m Greg’s brother. And eh…I’m straight….And…”

He was then greeted with the not too unexpected heckles of “Ah ha!?” “Uh Hum!?” “Yeah! OK GUUUURL”

He continued “ Yeah so….I’m not really sure how sexual to go here…I have some right WRONG stories…but I dunno…”

I think the chorus then pitched in ad-libs to the effect of “go on straight boy…get nasty” and “wrong is always right gurl”

He continued…”Eh? Greg?”

I then shared a story about my brother that I maybe shouldn’t have but that was right for the moment and that he was gracious and sporting enough to allow me to tell. Bless him, I loved him for jumping in at the deep end so unconditionally and I was so proud of him holding his own and shining in a world so alien to him.

So as to keep with the tone and the theme of unapologetic sexual confessions…I admitted or bragged actually, to the group that I can suck my own dick… Which luckily I didn’t discover I could do until about 2 years ago…Otherwise I would never have got an education, got a job or left the fucking house! Mind you, though no one in THAT particular room knew this self-sucking selling point, a good proportion of Grindr and South London’s sex party fraternity DO!

Stepping into an arena that is alien and embracing people that may seem alien to us can reward us with the greatest gifts sometimes. Regardless of what gender we are, what colour, what religion, what sexual orientation or what status. Alien to each other or not, we are all joined by common ground by sex and sexuality. The ability to love and the need for love and of course the joy of being able to laugh with and at each other.

AIDS IS NOT ALIEN!

Thank you

*The audience then applauded

One more thing guys…I asked Pat Cash for 20 seconds more to speak with you after I finished my piece. He very kindly allowed me that extra time. That’s like gold dust at these events so I’ll crack on. I just wanted to take a moment to point out why groups like Act Up and events like  this are so import for us right now.

I had managed to source some Truvada to use as Prep that I was due to start taking this weekend. Now I’m well enough clued up on Prep to know that before you start taking it you need to make sure you are definitely HIV negative so you don’t cause yourself problems with creating drug resistance issues by taking Truvada if you are positive and don’t know it. So off I went to Dean Street to take my test to confirm I was negative so I could start taking the meds that would KEEP me negative. 20 mins after arriving at the clinic yesterday – I was diagnosed as HIV positive. The irony is not lost on me. This is why us coming together and sharing and making changes in our world is so important. Prep needs to be made available to everyone and now!!! So someone else doesn’t find themselves in my shoes.

I wore this vest for a reason…

hiv front HIV back

Last week this vest was ironic – this week it’s uniform.

STAND TOGETHER – MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Thank you

Continue reading “AIDS SHITS AND GIGGLES”

INTERVIEW: A&U magazine speaks to GREG OWEN – The guy behind Equals=Equals

Hi Greg.

Thanks for taking the time to speak with our readers, most of whom are HIV-aware and involved in some kind of advocacy.

First, could you provide a short bio? What’s your advocacy background and anything else you’d like our readers to know about you?

I arrived at this point in my life, not through measured choice, I suppose I’m trying to make lemonade out of lemons. My life took a series of very unexpected turns. At the time, certainly not for the better, when the pain of that subsided and it started to hurt less and I began to find my feet… I decided to take ownership of things. Which has taken the shape of me fighting back, mainly against HIV and AIDS and the stigmas surrounding both. On my Facebook and Twitter I’ve had some lovely messages of “support and admiration” for my “bravery”. But I really can’t take credit for being “brave”. I’m just fighting back as much for me and my soul as for our positive friends and indeed our negative ones too.

What are the effects of HIV stigma, as you understand them?

HIV stigma and its impact, in my opinion is the root cause of the continued rising spike in new HIV transmissions among those HIV ‘hot spot groups’ that we are already aware of, i.e. gay men living in fast paced urban areas. But we’re now seeing a rising spike in various other demographics, like heterosexual women in the 50+ age bracket. The reason I attribute stigma as being at the core of this is because we’re all conditioned to believe that none of us should even be talking about sex, even though all of us are having sex. Somehow, even admitting that you’ve had a HIV test implies that you’re somehow unclean, dirty, irresponsible and reckless or a biological danger to those you are and have been intimate with.

Thirty-plus years on into the pandemic, HIV stigma persists. Why did you decide to focus on normalizing the conversation around sex and HIV for this social media campaign?

Unless we shock people into being desensitised to HIV we can’t hope to be able to encourage them to test regularly and make testing commonplace, without fear of judgment from others. The key here is that the people most likely to transmit HIV are those that don’t yet know that they’ve contracted it. Therefore, if we’re not testing regularly, diagnosing early and treating effectively – those most likely to pass on the virus, then we have no chance of tipping the scale on this alarming, seemingly relentless rise in new transmissions. Not many people know that we have the tools available now to actually make a huge impact in stopping new HIV transmissions. If you’re positive and on meds, taking them correctly and are undetectable, then it’s practically impossible for you to pass on the virus. In the same thread, those at high risk of HIV infection have access to/or soon will have access to PREP. This reduces the chance of contracting the virus (depending on which study you take your figures from), down to 5% – 15%. So the combination of treatment (for poz guys) and PREP (for neg guys) is a no brainer!

 How did you arrive at “Equals = Equals”?

I just think it works on a lot of levels. Mathematically it kind of works too. If we have something that’s positive, combined with something that’s negative, we neutralize that and they then become equal. And there in itself is a mission statement.

Was there a specific moment that sparked the idea for the campaign or a straw that broke the camel’s back where you said, “Okay, I need to do something”?

Yes, there were several straws and one tired ass camel!!! I suppose it was because I realised that there was sweet FA (Fuck All) that I could do about my life as I knew it, being turned upside down and basically taken away from me. Losing my fiancé and my home because he shut down and couldn’t cope with his recent diagnosis and me remaining negative.

When I accepted that I couldn’t change that. I slowly then began to realise what I could change is the world that he now has to live in as ‘the positive guy’. Being at sex parties or just out socially and bearing witness to some of the vile, heartless, cruel, passive attacks and active bullying that the positive guys around me were dealing with regularly, on a daily basis broke my heart a little bit more. And because my ex and I aren’t in touch anymore, it pained me so deeply to think that he was out there somewhere – alone, on the receiving end of that kind of unacceptable, archaic bullshit. Apologies for my colourful language, I’m Irish, we say it as it is.

What does Phase 2 and 3 involve, or do you want to defer talking about those until later?

I’m happy to chat about them now. I’d just like to take this opportunity to point out that Phase 2 and Phase 3 are hinging on Phase 1 being actioned and completed.

Hopefully the visibility that Phase 1 will create will provide a presence that should be easily approachable and more so easily contactable. Building on this, the ‘Equals=Equals’ Phase 2 will be a ‘drop in and a chat to a mate’ online support offering. Similar to that of an instant messaging service. The time when most people need to reach out and connect with someone that’s not in their inner circle/family/friends/partner or medical professional for advice and support, or just a chat about something non HIV related is in those first few weeks and months after a positive diagnosis, or whilst on PEP awaiting the results of that treatment. Ironically and cruelly, this is also the time when most people do not know who to turn to, or in actual fact have anyone to turn to for that support. They haven’t processed anything comprehensively enough, for them to be fear free enough of those stigmas and labels that will inevitably and irrevocably be thrown at them. This really is a short window period to help these guys and to maybe save a few lives and offer the support that to the best of my knowledge isn’t available, certainly not in this format. I have a Facebook inbox filled with 100’s if not 1000’s of messages back and forth from newly diagnosed guys needing someone to just talk it through with, poz guys that want to touch base about something, neg guys seeking information or advice and mixed status couples too. I can sometimes be online messaging and responding for 4-5hours and anytime of the day and night – luckily I sometimes suffer from insomnia so it’s a welcome distraction! But interacting with these wide range of guys on this level flagged up to me that there is most certainly a need for this kind of support to be made available in an extended, more structured fashion. I am after all only 1 guy on 1 Macbook!

Stage 3 is to build on what we have already achieved and step it up a notch by moving from offering online support to providing a space for people to come and find a sense of community somewhere ‘normal’ for want of a better word. When I say ‘normal’ I mean a place that they can find and invest in a community that is not directly or stereotypically associated with ‘the scene’. Where they can establish and invest in relationships and community – free from any stigma and any judgment. A place to just ‘be’. I think there will be a significant gearshift for Equals=Equals at this point as our focus widens and changes slightly. This kind of project I feel is of particular value to some of the younger community especially from ethnic or religious backgrounds where being gay is not accepted and the concept of them being gay and possibly HIV + would lead to serious repercussions. These are often the life blows that are the triggers for the journey to substance abuse, reckless behaviour, irreparable self-loathing and self-worth issues, and in more extreme cases homelessness and prostitution.

Is this U.K.-only (in terms of mailing out the T-shirts, etc.)?

Nope – the great thing about the T-shirt activity is that we have – or will have a fixed price per unit cost to produce each T-shirt. The only financial impact that we would then have to incorporate when going ‘international’ would be the increase in the cost of postage and packaging. So it is an activity than can be rolled out anywhere. And nothing would please me more than to see all sorts of people supporting this by wearing their Equal=Equals T-shirts, taking their photos and posting them online! In effect putting those 3 letters H. I. V. EVERYWHERE – from The Statue of Liberty to Sydney Opera House to The Great Wall of China and Big Ben!

The last thing I want to say is that although HIV and the impact of HIV bulldozing its way into my life almost ruined me and pushed me to a suicide attempt – thankfully a failed one. I now feel like I/we are already winning! HIV screwed up my life but I fought back with the help and support of friends, family and community. And I look at the all people this activity is already reaching out to and supporting and helping and I can see nothing but positive things! Excuse the pun! Taking ownership of HIV’s presence in my life has allowed us to start to claw back an advantage – even on some small level. For that I am very grateful.

Thanks guys for speaking with me and thanks for supporting Equals=Equals.

Big love.

x

Continue reading “INTERVIEW: A&U magazine speaks to GREG OWEN – The guy behind Equals=Equals”